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Educate

Our Education Program

Our Education Program is responsible for providing our community with knowledge about melanoma, the most common cancer in young adults ages 25-29.

We share facts about melanoma including the risk factors as well as prevention and detection techniques.

We do our best educate all those who will listen about the dangers of skin cancer in order to protect all members of our community from the dangers of melanoma. Knowledge is power and knowledge can save lives.

Do you use protection?

One in five people will develop skin cancer. Yes, one in five! Skin cancer doesn’t care what age, what gender, or what ethnicity you are. A whopping 86 percent of Melanoma skin cancers are associated with UV radiation from the sun. In other words, if you’re in the sun, use protection!

No matter what you are doing outside; walking your pet, watching a baseball game, or running in our upcoming Beca’s Five race don’t forget the sunscreen.

Here are some sun safety tips!

– Seek the shade. Especially between the hours of 10 am and 4 pm when the sun is at its strongest.

– Do not let yourself burn. Your chances of developing Melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer, doubles when you’ve had multiple (5 or more) burns over the years.

– Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths. You are 74 times more likely, let that sink in for a minute, 74 times more likely to develop Melanoma than those that have never tanned indoors. So, don’t do it!

– Cover up. We know you have an amazing new swimsuit, but limit your exposure to the sun and cover up during those peak hours. Long sleeves, long pants, hats, and don’t forget the sunglasses!

– Use sunscreen. A broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) with an SPF 15 or higher. If you are going to be outdoors for extended times or in the water, go with an SPF of 30 or higher. Be sure to apply sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes prior to going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating.

– Get to know your body. Be aware of all of your freckles, moles, and spots. Exam your skin, head to toe, every month. If you notice any changes in existing moles or a spot that is not healing, go see your physician immediately.

– Remember, your dermatologist is your friend. Go see them every year and discuss your body together.
Be aware, show you care, and take time to share this information with those you love.

Together we can educate, together we can provide hope, and together we can save lives.

For more information about prevention and detection or educational events we will be at please contact Tena Harjoe

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Mailing Address

Blackout Melanoma
1100 Town and Country Commons Dr.
PO Box 6512
Chesterfield, MO 63017-8285